Category Archives: Uncategorized

FlappyHand: Unity3D game with an ESP8266 Arduino (Wemos) controller over WiFi

I thought it would be fun to make a little FlappyBird clone using an ultrasonic sensor as the controller.
So I threw this together yesterday:

What you’re seeing there is an ultrasonic sensor on the table reading how far my hand is away from it, then it sends that value over WiFi to the Unity3D game, which then maps that to the plane movements.
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Nuget: Your project.json doesn’t list ‘win10-x86’ as a targeted runtime

Recently I was working on a small UWP app on my SurfaceBook and everything was fine. But when I pulled the code from GitHub down to my main machine I got the following error:

Your project.json doesn’t list ‘win10-x86’ as a targeted runtime. You should add ‘”win10-x86″: { }’ inside your “runtimes” section in your project.json, and then re-run NuGet restore. 

After a while I figured out that this error is totally misleading, and the real problem is that your Nuget package source has been disabled. I have a feeling this was related to installing Visual Studio 15 preview.

Anyway, to fix it: Click Tools > Options > NuGet Package Manager > Package Sources, and then re-enable (or re-add) the sources.NuGet Package Manager

Varsity College

An interesting way to judge hackathons

A while back Taylor Gibb, Gordon Beeming, and I held a Windows Phone hackathon at Varsity College. Generally when we hold a hackathon the challenge is to build a Windows Phone (or Windows) app over the weekend, and then we award the “best” app with a phone etc. We walk around to each person and score their app against various criteria like quality, relevance, functionality, etc. The problem with this is that it is very formal. We aren’t in the business of rating code, and hackathons aren’t really about making the perfect app in a few hours. Hackathons are about learning and having fun.

Students

We decided that it could be fun to let the attendees do the judging instead – but that was just as rigid and structured as us doing it. So Taylor came up with a rather interesting voting system to let attendees judge each others’ apps, which we then coded.

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